States & Communities

Learn how the Bright Futures materials and resources are being used across the country by selecting a state with an asterisk (*) beside the state’s name.

state-map.pngFor some states, we offer audio recordings along with brief implementation stories gathered through interviews. For other states, implementation examples were gathered through online research. We’re actively gathering implementation stories from states without an *. For all states, you can find state AAP chapter contact information and a link to locate state Maternal and Child Health contacts.

 Everyone Has a Role to Play in Promoting Children's Health

Bright Futures is based on the belief that families have the primary responsibility for promoting the health and well-being of their children, whereas state and local government agencies and community organizations have the responsibility for helping families access resources that provide a safe and healthful environment in which they can live and learn, play and grow. Pediatric health care professionals, along with community organizations and government agencies, provide expert support and guidance to families in their important efforts to ensure the health and well-being of children, the nation's future. Family materials that are based on the Bright Futures family-centered approach provide information and resources that families can use to be effective partners with their health care providers and others.

Many state and local health departments find that integrating Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents into health promotion and prevention programs helps them accomplish their goals of improving the health of the children in their jurisdiction, leading to better health outcomes. For example, Women, Infants, and Children programs are turning to Bright Futures: Nutrition, 3rd Edition and other Bright Futures materials (eg, handouts) to provide helpful nutrition advice to families in need. 

Many state Medicaid agencies have adopted the Bright Futures/AAP Periodicity Schedule as a standard for pediatric preventive services through state Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSTD) programs, thus ensuring that children and adolescents obtaining care through government agencies receive the same covered preventive services as those who participate in private health insurance plans. Meanwhile, schools, community organizations, and public–private partnerships are incorporating the family-centered, health promotion, and disease prevention approach and materials offered by Bright Futures into their own health promotion and prevention initiatives.   

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With Bright Futures officially recognized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as the blueprint for all visits to health care providers for health supervision (often referred to as well-child visits), now is the time for all states and communities to put Bright Futures into practice!

 Take the Next Step!

Not sure whom to work with to implement Bright Futures in your area? Visit the Partners for Implementation section to learn about organizations that can help get the job done!

If you've assembled your partners and are ready for the next step, download 12 Practical Tips for Implementing Bright Futures Guidelines at the State or Community Level to explore how your state can implement the approaches in the Bright Futures Guidelines!

If you are an individual clinic or medical practice looking for help implementing the Bright Futures screening tools and materials, see the Clinical Practice section.